Lincoln Durham – Tickets – The Funhouse @ Mr. Smalls – Millvale, PA – May 17th, 2017

Lincoln Durham

Mr. Smalls Presents

Lincoln Durham

Will Varley, Ghost Guts

Wed, May 17, 2017

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$10.00 - $12.00

This event is 21 and over

Lincoln Durham
Lincoln Durham
Armed with old bastardized mid-century guitars, hand-me-down fiddles and banjos, home-made contraptions with just enough tension on a string to be considered an instrument and any random percussive item he can get his claws or hooves on, Lincoln Durham is an amped up Southern-Gothic Psycho-Blues Revival-Punk One-Man-Band preaching the good word of depravity. With driving guttural beats back-boning his growling instruments Lincoln births a sound that transcends genres while telling dark and raw tales that Mr. Poe would have blessed with his own tears.

His last album, Exodus of the Deemed Unrighteous, aimed to take a hundred-foot scythe to the doubters and the naysayers; and, as if he’s left the field decimated as evidence of his victory and has nowhere left to turn but inward, Revelations of a Mind Unraveling is pure descent into the internal agonies of Lincoln Durham’s tormented mind.

The first half of the album echoes the 19th century French poet Stéphane Mallarmé’s sentiment that “Poetry is the language of a state of crisis.” We might even imagine the ghost of Mallarmé smiling with pleasure while listening to Lincoln rambling that: “I find no interest in the methodical stabilities of the sane/For I delight in the shadowy corners of unhinged thought, eating up my bad brains,” in the song, “Prophet Incarnate.” This, ladies and gentlemen, is the moment that we as listeners, and thereby witnesses, begin to see an already frayed mind start to come undone.

As the record progresses and shifts into complete mental breakdown, one of the instants of greatest risk in the album also begets one of the most powerful images: “White dove sitting in a cage/Choking on the olive branch and waiting for his chance to unleash his cooped rage.” These lines are taken from the song “Noose” at a time in which we can’t be sure if the journey to the center of darkness has revealed a part of our narrator that must be killed or can’t be killed.

This, of course, begs the central question of the album: What happens when self-reflection reveals the demon inside? Well, to back up a bit: If you’re Lincoln Durham, you write songs about the demon. But also, you howl the demon out, you beat drums with it and wrap the strings of your instruments around its neck. And when it’s all said and done, you wipe the sweat off your forehead, look around at the wreckage of derailed sanity, and you take a bow.

Which is also a roundabout way of saying that Lincoln’s true story is in his live show. The hunger in his sweat-drenched, electrifying and mesmerizing one-man-band show makes you feel every scar and drop of blood in his painfully intimate lyrics. It takes something beautifully “off” to get on stage with just hands and feet for a band, to be driven by a howling voice, and to morbidly preach a music that harkens back to the old blues masters, Son House and Fred McDowell, infused with the edge and angst of Punk and darkened from the bad influences of Tom Waits and Nick Cave.

To watch Lincoln perform is to be a bystander to a soul collapsing in on itself. Audience members often report feeling like they’ve wandered into a two hundred year old ghostly church abandoned just outside the swamps of Louisiana. They say finding Durham is like opening a sealed-off (for good reason) door and being confronted with the piercing verses of a long exiled hellfire preacher. Others express having been exposed to the pits of realm never meant to be seen. You might say, as Lincoln does in “Bide My Time,” that what they see is his “countenance grow[ing] ever blacker, and [his] pallor brighter white,” as he digs deeper into the recesses.

A fact of this album is that the further he’s lost into the terrible domain of his own psyche, the more the listener is pulled into the void, as well. Expect to be leaning forward not just in body but also in spirit because what this albums is in its essence is the trashcan-loud sound of a man internalizing reality until it begins to tear at him from the inside and he has no choice but to take the plunge.

In the song “Creeper,” Lincoln sings “My mama said that before I could talk, I could flat-out rock ’n’ roll/She never said that before I could rest, I’d have to save my own soul.” These might be the most revealing lines in the entire album because at heart Lincoln is wielding his art as a means of coping with the world both inside and outside of him—which essentially means that this is a man playing for the highest of stakes: redemption.

Take a journey with Lincoln Durham and Revelations of a Mind Unraveling and you will be forced to face demons. At worst, you’ll end up a deranged fiend screaming on the sidewalk at children’s kites flying in the park. But it’s also very possible that, as a reward for standing at the edge and looking the thing in the mouth, you’ll get to exorcise a few demons of your own.
Will Varley
Will Varley
In March 2015 Will Varley walked out on stage at the Royal Albert Hall, shortly after signing a record deal with independent music champions Xtra Mile Recordings. His new album ‘Postcards From Ursa Minor’ was released on October 30th and recieved extensive national airplay, with The Independent describing it as ‘A gem of a record’.

For the 28 year old folk-singer however, the road to The Albert Hall began in the early 2000’s whilst aimlessly busking around London with a fake id, writting hundreds of songs and playing two or three open mics a week. Varley was a regular at numerous acoustic nights and folk clubs throughout South London from an early age, and spent most of his teens travelling around the capital looking for places that would let him play a few songs.

In his early 20’s Varley moved to Deal, Kent enticed by cheap rent and great pubs. There along with a number of musicians he helped set up Smugglers Records, a collective of like minded independent musicians who help eachother release their own music. Since it’s inception the collective has been instrumental in starting the careers of numerous artists as well as putting on their own sell out music festival deep in the Kent countryside, not far from the sea.

In 2011 Varley recorded his debut album ‘Advert Soundtracks’ with Smugglers, and then set out on the road and walked a hundred and thirty miles with a guitar and tent on his back. Starting the walking tour at London Bridge he headed south east, strolling through the rolling hills of the Kent wield and singing songs to whoever would listen. He slept in barns, camped at the side of canals and played gigs in the corner of crowded pubs. By the time he strolled back to deal, despite the blisters and the aching muscles, word of his album had begun to spread and he had many a story to tell.

Varley’s live performances have become more and more anarchic over the years. Audience interaction, surreal improvised comedy between songs and chaotic stunts like playing two songs at the same time are now more often than not included in his shows, though he will just as quickly deliver a melancholic and heartbreaking ballad or a fiery protest song as he will a shaggy dog story or an amusing talking blues.

After self-publishing his first novel ‘Sketch of A Last Day’ (Reaching No.1 in Kindle’s Political Fiction category) and almost two years of relentless gigging, including shows at the Occupy London protests & The Bank of Ideas, with the help of David Hatton Jnr. (of the band Cocos Lovers), 11 new songs were recorded in the basement of an old smugglers cottage in Deal. Outside the coastal wind rattled the doors and windows, fresh off the English Channel. In between sips of Glen Moray and glasses of red wine the pair drafted in a number of musicians to help record an album that was written partly on the road and partly in the smoking areas of Deal’s countless public houses.

Though still littered with his trademark humour, ‘As The Crow Flies’ was a darker, more mature album which saw Varley’s poetry take centre stage, from the brutal honesty of the album’s title track, to the swaying cynicism of ‘Weddings and Wars’ in which he attempts a history of the world in under four minutes.

A second walking tour followed the release of As The Crow Flies, which saw Varley travelling 500 miles along England’s south coast, with a guitar on his back, entirely on foot. After the tour Varley played a sold out show at London’s Bush Hall. A couple of extensive tours with Beans On Toast helped to introduce his music to a whole new audience whilst gigs in Ireland, Belgium and Switzerland also saw Will take his first steps outside of the UK.

On March 29th, the troubador stepped out on stage at The Royal Albert Hall. About an hour before this he’d signed a deal with Xtra Mile Recordings, who are behind the success of acts like Frank Turner, Beans On Toast and To Kill A King. Less than a month later a digital only EP was released which Varley recorded live at one of his favourite music venues. The resulting EP ‘Will Varley: Live at The Lighthouse’ peaked at number 14 in the iTunes Singer Songwriter charts.

The summer of 2015 saw Will supporting The Proclaimers on tour across the UK as well as performing at a long list of UK festivals including Secret Garden Party, Bestival and Green Man. He also spent much of this summer recording his third studio album with Tristan Ivemy producing. The album was released on October 30th to much critical acclaim and radio play. Soon after the release Will set off on a huge tour opening for Frank Turner, culminating in show at London’s Alexandra Palace.

In early 2016 Varley toured Germany, Austria, Switzerland and the USA opening for Frank Turner and in March he embarked on a huge sell-out headline tour of the UK. The Spring saw him touring once again with The Proclaimers and he also opened a handful of shows for his life-long hero Billy Bragg across northern England. Over the summer he performed at numerous festivals including triumphant sets at Cambridge Folk Festival, Bestival and Glastonbury.

After another huge tour of the USA in the Autumn, Varley released his 4th full length album ‘Kingsdown Sundown’ to much critical acclaim including a 4/5 review from The Independent and extensive national radio play. The record reached number 26 in the Official Independent Album Charts. Following the release Will returned to the UK for another headline tour, culminating in a huge sell out show at London’s Union Chapel. He finished the year with headline outings to Ireland and Germany with further sell-out shows in Belfast, Hamburg & Berlin.
Venue Information:
The Funhouse @ Mr. Smalls
400 Lincoln Ave
Millvale, PA, 15209